5 Assumptions Employers Make About You Based on Your Resume

View of a Young attractive employer analysing resume of woman

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When going over your resume hiring managers are expected to make an important decision. They need to decide whether they want to meet you in person or not. So, based on what you put on your resume, hiring managers will put you under their microscope and start making quick impressions about who you are.

This happens because examining your resume is the only way hiring managers can see you and make assumptions about what you are like. While this shouldn’t be much of a problem for you, it means that your resume is the first chance you have got to make a good impression, and you have to make it count.

See Also: 3 Reasons Why You Should Never Lie on Your CV

Employers can tell a lot about you from your resume so make sure your resume is top notch:

1. You Are Not Up-to-Date

Including a Hotmail or an AOL email address on your resume will make you look like you still live in the 90s. This doesn’t look good considering that these two email providers were popular in the past, but not really today. If you want to appear more up-to-date, perhaps you want to include your Gmail address on your resume which sounds more professional and modern.

2. You Are Sloppy

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If your resume is filled with typos, grammar and spelling mistakes, you will probably likely make a negative impression on employers. These errors tell employers that you didn’t spend much time working on your resume before you sent it and as such you risk coming off as sloppy, careless, unorganised, and not at all thorough – even though you have included this in your skills section. Sometimes this can even mean that you did take the time to proofread your resume but weren’t as careful as you should have been.

3. You Are Going to be Expensive

Employers know overqualified job seekers when they see them. In fact, they can tell if someone’s overqualified by taking only a quick glance at their resume. A Ph.D., advanced skills and experience only mean that you are going to expect a much high salary than they are willing to offer. Also, the older you are, the more expensive you are going to be, and this is why they often choose to hire younger people who will be satisfied with a lower salary.

4. You Are a Job-Hopper

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No employer likes a job-hopper. If your resume shows hiring managers that you can’t stay in a job for a long period of time, the first assumption they will make is that you are a slacker and that you like to jump in and out of jobs frequently. Regardless of the reason you are changing jobs often; employers will think that you can’t commit to anything or dedicate to your work. Since they want to hire individuals who are able to keep a job for more than six months, they will immediately move on to the next candidate.

5. You Don’t Want the Job

Your resume is generic as you didn’t bother of making it as closely related to the job advert as possible. Instead you have sent out a resume whose objective is so vague it makes it difficult for employers to understand what you are looking for in terms of your career. Not customising your resume to the job only shows recruiters that you don’t really care about the job and that working for them is not your first choice. This also might tell them that you haven’t researched the company as much as you should have and as such don’t know how to make your resume more relevant to the position.

See Also: What You Should Not Do at Your Next Job Interview

If you want to convince employers to like you, then you need to look at things from their point of view sometimes. Before sending out your resume, think about what you would expect to see in a candidate’s resume if you were the employer and figure out why you would or wouldn’t hire them. This should make you more critical about your own work and more careful next time you are applying for a job.

So what do you think employers are saying about you judging from your resume? Let me know in the comments section below…;

Source

http://careeraddict.com